becoming a surfboard shaper

Any discussion on shaping, designing, repairing and riding surfcraft of any type or shape. Also a good place to ask the 'what board should I buy?' question.

becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby Surfdaw » Sat Jun 29, 2013 8:16 am

hi guys, I was hoping you guys can help me out here. I am from Korea and I LOVE surfing and plan on surfing for life even though my family tells me to study hard and graduae college and work my ass off. Well, I have been doing a lot of thinkin and always end wanting to shape surfboards and maybe use some of my drawings on my work, but shaping surfboard is my main plan. So here is the plan, but wish you guys can give me some information that I never seem to obtain by googling.
I plan on working in korea first and save u enough money to go abroad Austrailia or states on working holiday visa and personally visit surfboard factories or shops that would take me in as an apprentice then start learning to shape surfboards.

1. Which area in austrailia or states should I go to learn to shape?
2. is personally visitng surfboard makers then asking them to take me in the best option I got?

alright guys... stay stoked and please help me out!
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby kayu » Sat Jun 29, 2013 6:02 pm

In Australia , Gold Coast is your best option......there's a few Korean surfers amoung the Japanese community here , and that's probably your best place to make local contacts.....One of the Korean guys shapes some excellent boards , and quite a few of the Jap guys shape ,glass polish etc..........got any pics of Korean waves ?......I hear mixed reports.
currumbinwoodworks.com.au
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby Black » Sat Jun 29, 2013 10:05 pm

Do both what you want and what your family wants. You can study well at a coastal location and make boards yourself in all the spare student time you get, which is plenty. 1 You will find out if you like making boards. 2 You will find out if you can sell the boards you make. 3 You can surf your boards and refine them. 4 You will gain experience in board making/design. 5 You will get the qualification your family approves of if your surfing dream fails.
Never growing old together...
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby Surfdaw » Thu Jul 18, 2013 9:16 am

thanks guys.
First of all, aside from the useful information, I'd like to thank you guys for that your replies are giving me hopes AGAIN (from yahoo answers, I got destroyed. people telling me even very popular shapers are broke these days so I better find other options blah blah yeah)

btw, Korean waves are surfable, but rarely big, and no tubes at all. But I might be wrong because I never surfed in Korea
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby Surfdaw » Thu Jul 18, 2013 9:17 am

kayu wrote:In Australia , Gold Coast is your best option......there's a few Korean surfers amoung the Japanese community here , and that's probably your best place to make local contacts.....One of the Korean guys shapes some excellent boards , and quite a few of the Jap guys shape ,glass polish etc..........got any pics of Korean waves ?......I hear mixed reports.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KHkPd7ybjYY this is a clip from my hometown.
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby royal » Sat Jul 20, 2013 12:07 am

people say there is no money in surfboards for a reason, sadly it's true. When I look at my bank account every month, versus what it was when I had a "real" job, it could make me laugh out loud (it does quite often actually.) The margins are so small many accountants have asked me if I'm stupid to be in this business, and every year the tax collectors call me up looking for their share of my meager earnings. The general trend in surfing is toward cheap, throw away products, usually bought by people who don't know, or care about the history, unwritten etiquette, and culture of surfing. Low price, or big name dominates the market these days. It takes years to get to a point where you can consistently make a good product, and even then people will try to bring you down on price.

In other words, it's an uphill battle, in a shrinking market.

However, I would never trade my "job" for another 9-5 grind. Not a chance, as long as I can support myself. Somedays are better than others, but when all is said and done, you've made something that will make someone, or many people, happy for a long time. And, you've made it with your own hands/brain/soul.

Is it worth being a broke, crazy old surf bum? You bet! Is it realistic for everyone? No way. You need to decide just how much you want it, because it isn't easy.

I would say that you could do both, get an education while learning to build boards. That way you're covered all around.

Good luck!
learn the rules, so you can break them properly

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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby majordom » Sat Jul 20, 2013 7:09 am

go study in OZ - it will make you happy and your folks

you can study surf and shape all at the same time

just dont apply to the university of alice springs ! :-D
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby d.kennett 1983 » Sat Aug 03, 2013 8:15 am

royal wrote:people say there is no money in surfboards for a reason, sadly it's true. When I look at my bank account every month, versus what it was when I had a "real" job, it could make me laugh out loud (it does quite often actually.) The margins are so small many accountants have asked me if I'm stupid to be in this business, and every year the tax collectors call me up looking for their share of my meager earnings. The general trend in surfing is toward cheap, throw away products, usually bought by people who don't know, or care about the history, unwritten etiquette, and culture of surfing. Low price, or big name dominates the market these days. It takes years to get to a point where you can consistently make a good product, and even then people will try to bring you down on price.

In other words, it's an uphill battle, in a shrinking market.

However, I would never trade my "job" for another 9-5 grind. Not a chance, as long as I can support myself. Somedays are better than others, but when all is said and done, you've made something that will make someone, or many people, happy for a long time. And, you've made it with your own hands/brain/soul.

Is it worth being a broke, crazy old surf bum? You bet! Is it realistic for everyone? No way. You need to decide just how much you want it, because it isn't easy.

I would say that you could do both, get an education while learning to build boards. That way you're covered all around.

Good luck!


Amen to that rob so true
http://kandksurfboards.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/KK-surfboards/332681570101640
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Re: becoming a surfboard shaper

Postby d.kennett 1983 » Sat Aug 03, 2013 8:15 am

royal wrote:people say there is no money in surfboards for a reason, sadly it's true. When I look at my bank account every month, versus what it was when I had a "real" job, it could make me laugh out loud (it does quite often actually.) The margins are so small many accountants have asked me if I'm stupid to be in this business, and every year the tax collectors call me up looking for their share of my meager earnings. The general trend in surfing is toward cheap, throw away products, usually bought by people who don't know, or care about the history, unwritten etiquette, and culture of surfing. Low price, or big name dominates the market these days. It takes years to get to a point where you can consistently make a good product, and even then people will try to bring you down on price.

In other words, it's an uphill battle, in a shrinking market.

However, I would never trade my "job" for another 9-5 grind. Not a chance, as long as I can support myself. Somedays are better than others, but when all is said and done, you've made something that will make someone, or many people, happy for a long time. And, you've made it with your own hands/brain/soul.

Is it worth being a broke, crazy old surf bum? You bet! Is it realistic for everyone? No way. You need to decide just how much you want it, because it isn't easy.

I would say that you could do both, get an education while learning to build boards. That way you're covered all around.

Good luck!


Amen to that rob so true
http://kandksurfboards.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/KK-surfboards/332681570101640
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